Last Destination

Last Destination is an American loathsomeness establishment focused around an unproduced spec script by Jeffrey Reddick, initially composed for the X-Files TV arrangement. Conveyed by New Line Cinema, every one of the five movies are focused on the subjects of submission to the inevitable, destiny, and precognition, in connection to death. In a less theoretical sense, each one film emphasizes a hero having a feeling of a horrible mishap that would murder various individuals, including the hero them self  The hero and a few other individuals then escape from the scene of the mishap, before it happens much the same as in the hero's vision. The gathering of individuals then begin kicking the bucket in an arrangement of unusual mischances that every now and again take after Rube Goldberg machines in their intricacy.

The arrangement is paramount amongst others in the terribleness classification in that the "scalawag" of the films is not the cliché slashers, creatures, animals, mammoths, or evil spirits. It is the substance Death itself, which controls the earth in fatal routes with the purpose of "recovering" the individuals who some way or another oversee to escape their destinies the first run through. Some of them attempt to take their lives by submitting suicide, however Death normally seems to defeat their arrangements to guarantee that they kick the bucket the way it plans them to.

Ew talk with Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse



EW: The whole idea of flash-sideways and the plan to use season 6 to show us a world where Oceanic 815 never crashed — how long has that been in the works? Why did you want to do it?
DAMON LINDELOF: It’s been in play for at least a couple of years. We knew that the ending of the time travel season was going to be an attempt to reboot. And as a result, we [knew] the audience was going to come out of the “do-over moment” thinking we were either going start over or just say it didn’t work and continue on. [We thought] wouldn’t it be great if we did both? That was the origin of the story.

CARLTON CUSE: We thought just doing one [of those options] would inherently not be satisfying. Since the very beginning of the show, characters started crossing through each other’s stories. Part of our desire [in season 6] is to show that there’s still this kind of weave, that these characters still would have impacted each other’s lives even without the event of crashing on the Island. Obviously, the big question of the season is going to be: How do these [two timelines] reconcile? However, for the fans who have not watched the show closely, that’s an intact narrative. You can just watch the flash sideways — they stand alone all by themselves. For the fans who are more deeply embedded in the show, you can watch those flash sideways, compare them to what transpired in the flashbacks and go, “Oh, that’s an interesting difference.”

LINDELOF: Right out of the gate, in the first five minutes of the premiere, you get hit over the head with two things that you’re not expecting. The first is that Desmond is on the plane. The second thing that we do is we drop out of the plane and we go below the water and we see that the Island is submerged. What we’re trying to do there is basically say to you, “God bless the survivors of Oceanic 815, because they’re so self-centered, they thought the only effect [of detonating the bomb] was going to be that their plane never crashes.” But they don’t stop to think, “If we do this in 1977, what else is going to affected by this?” So that their entire lives can be changed radically. In fact, it would appear that they’ve sunken the Island. That’s our way of saying, “Keep your eyes peeled for the differences that you’re not expecting.” Some of these characters were still in Australia, but some weren’t. Shannon’s not there. Boone actually says that he tried to get her back. There are all sorts of other people that we don’t see. 

Where’s Libby? Where’s Ana Lucia? Where’s Eko? These are all the things that you’re supposed to be thinking about. When our characters posited the “What if?” scenario, they neglected to think about what the other effects of potentially changing time might be and we’re embracing those things.

That said, are you saying definitively that detonating Jughead was the event that created this new timeline? Or is that a mystery which the season 6 story will reveal?

LINDELOF: It’s a mystery. A big one.

CUSE: We did have some concern that it might be confusing kind of going into the season. To clear that up a little bit: The archetypes of the characters are the same and that’s the most significant thing. Kate is still a fugitive. If you were to look at the Comic-Con video, for instance, that now comes into play. There was a different scenario in that story. She basically blew up an apprentice plumber as opposed to killing her biological father/stepfather. Those kind of differences exist, but who the characters fundamentally are is the same. If it becomes too confusing for you, you can just follow the flash sideways for what they are. It’s not as though there’s narrative that hangs on the fact that you need to know that this event was different in that world, in the flashback world versus the sideways world. That’s not critical for being able to process the narrative this season.

Is there a relationship between Island reality and sideways reality? Will they run parallel for the remainder of the season? Will they fuse together? Might one fade away?

LINDELOF: For us, the big risk that we’re taking in the final season of the show is basically this very question. [Lindelof then explains the show has replaced the trademark “whoosh!” sound effect marking the segue between Island present story and flashbacks or flash-forwards, thus calling conspicuous attention to the relationship between the Island world and the Sideways world.] This is the critical mystery of the season, which is, “What is the relationship between these two shows?” And we don’t use the phrase “alternate reality,” because to call one of them an “alternate reality” is to infer that one of them isn’t real, or one of them is real and the other is the alternate to being real.

CUSE: But the questions you’re asking are exactly the right questions. What are we to make of the fact that they’re showing us two different timelines? Are they going to resolve? Are they going to connect? Are they going to co-exist in parallel fashion? Are they going to cross? Do they intersect? Does one prove to be viable and the other one not? I think those are all the kind of speculations that are the right speculations to be having at this point in the season.

LINDELOF: But it is going to require patience. We’ve taught the audience how to be patient thus far, so while they’re getting a lot of mythological answers on the island early in the season, this idea of what is the relationship between the two [worlds] is a little bit more of a slow burn.
Did Jughead really sink the Island? And is it possible that the Sideways characters are now caught in a time loop in which they might have to go back in time and fulfill the obligation to continuity by detonating the bomb?

LINDELOF: These questions will be dealt with on the show. Should you infer that the detonation of Jughead is what sunk the island? Who knows? But there’s the Foot. What do you get when you see that shot? It looks like New Otherton got built. These little clues [might help you] extrapolate when the Island may have sunk. Start to think about it. A couple of episodes down the road, some of the characters might even discuss it. We will say this: season 6 is not about time travel. It’s about the implications, the aftermath, and the causality of trying to change the past. But the idea of continuing to do paradoxical storytelling is not what we’re interested in this year
.

Talk Destination Lost

"Destination Lost" is a clip show that aired during the hour before the premiere of Season 2 on September 21, 2005, showing events from the entire first season.

ABC once again invites new and avid Lost viewers to take another look at one of the most talked about shows. "Destination Lost" will explore the series in a way that will bring new viewers up to date—but which current viewers will also find illuminating—in anticipation of the series' second season premiere. From the back stories of some of the most interesting characters on television to the mysteries of the Island, "Destination Lost" will provide an insightful glimpse into the lives of some of the survivors of the doomed Oceanic Airlines Flight 815.

USCIS, FBI Eliminate National Name Check Backlog


WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) today announced that, in partnership with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), it has met all milestones set forth in a joint business plan announced April 2, 2008, resulting in the elimination of the FBI National Name Check Program (NNCP) backlog.

“Our close partnership with the FBI has resulted in the accomplishment of this significant achievement with national security as its foundation,” said USCIS Acting Deputy Director Michael Aytes.  “This continued working relationship will help to ensure that name check processing is accomplished as quickly as possible without compromising security concerns.”

The final goal of the business plan was to achieve a sustainable performance level by the NNCP of completing 98 percent of name check requests submitted by USCIS within 30 days, and the remaining two percent within 90 days.  This performance level will become the new standard.

These vastly improved performance levels were achieved through a variety of collaborative steps taken by USCIS and the FBI, including:

an increase in NNCP staffing made possible by the transfer of appropriated funds from USCIS funding and additional fee revenue for name check processing;
name check  process improvements initiated by the FBI;
refinements in the name check file search criteria which enabled the FBI to focus on files most likely to yield pertinent search results;
training of NNCP staff on USCIS adjudication requirements and the applicability of name check search results to USCIS adjudications; and
other cooperative measures including assignment of USCIS personnel to the NNCP.
As is the case with all security checks undertaken by USCIS, any information provided by the FBI through these checks may require further evaluation and may need additional interaction with agencies outside USCIS to obtain updated or additional information.  This could result in additional delays in processing and is not governed by the processing goals contained in the joint business plan.

In the majority of instances, however, the completion of a backlogged FBI name check has resulted in a “no record response.”  As a result, USCIS has been able to resume normal processing of most cases which most often ends in a final determination of eligibility.  Next steps in the adjudication of cases that were previously delayed as a result a pending FBI name check request may now include updating fingerprint results, scheduling interviews, requesting additional evidence and other reviews to determine whether the applicant is eligible for the requested immigration benefit.

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